Tag Archives: body clock

Meet Us at the Bus Stop

So . . . how many of you are driving to work at 6:30ish? Ever see a kid suddenly caught in your headlights as they are waiting for the bus?

Over the last months the Start School Later movement has been gathering steam as almost 3,000 people across the nation have signed the petition, and the media has discussed the research showing that students do better when school starts later.

This week, on Thursday January 26th, the Meet us at the Bus Stop event is happening across the country to highlight how early children have to get up for school, so early that they are often waiting in the dark, on cold winter mornings, to catch the bus. Please join in by posting photos or video interviews of your children as they are waiting for the bus on Thursday morming. You can post them on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/events/279393105455960/

See video from the previous Winter Solstice 2011 event at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rl0zvs43wjQ&feature=youtu.be

Sign the Start School Later petition at http://signon.org/sign/promote-legislation-to.fb1?source=s.fb&r_by=1521139

Melatonin, the Sleep Hormone

You have probably heard of melatonin, one of our bodies’ endogenous hormones. Today we’ll talk about natural melatonin cycles, how melatonin relates to health, and also how melatonin is taken as a supplement.

Your Natural Melatonin Cycle
Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. It also acts as a neurotransmitter. In dim light conditions melatonin levels will start to rise about 2 hours before your habitual bedtime, and peak about 2 hours afterwards. This increase is partly responsible for tired feelings before bedtime. It will decline during the night and be at very low levels during the day. Melatonin is suppressed by bright light, such as sunshine.

People who are either “larks” or “owls,” have a melatonin rhythm that is different from the norm. This causes them either to get sleepy much earlier in the day – “larks”, or much later than usual – “owls.” An example is found during puberty in teenagers whose melatonin rhythm shifts later, causing their sleep and wake times to shift later.

Uses of Melatonin
Melatonin can be taken as a supplement to improve sleep. In the past, higher doses (5-10mg) were used like a pharmaceutical drug, and some people experienced a hang-over effect the next morning. Newer research has shown that much lower doses (.3-3mg), which are in line with the levels naturally found in the body, are just as effective.

– Precisely timed melatonin can be used to shift the habitual sleep time for those people who are “owls” or “larks.” Exposure to bright light can also be used to shift sleep times as it will suppress melatonin.
– Melatonin can be used by travelers to reduce jet-lag symptoms. It is especially effective when used in combination with a well-thought out sleep schedule, bright light exposure and limiting light with sunglasses.
– Melatonin can be a gentle aid in promoting sleep for those who have sleep onset insomnia. There are also time-released formulas for people who have difficulty staying asleep through the night.

You can always take advantage of your endogenous melatonin rhythm by going to bed at approximately the same time each night, and getting bright light exposure in the morning. This is one way to naturally keep your sleep healthy!